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The text and prose is often tedious making somewhat vacuous points. Then there was the tariff and the boom and bust economic cycles that were exacerbated by the gold standard and fights over the place of silver in the economy. As I began reading Richard White’s “The Republic for Which it Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896,” I glanced over to a brief review of the book by another Goodreads reader. Be part of the world’s largest community of book lovers on Goodreads. An excellent read! Throughout it all the centrality of the home, in its widest sense, is pointed out. He rose from humble beginnings in Atlanta where his father instilled it's VERY long and some of the people white uses to pry open both the narrative and the significance of history are people you have probably heard of already ready -- WCTU, two different henry adamses, tom scott. A horrible book, it took me months to get through as it could not hold my interest for more than a few pages at a time. It's also seriously depressing in parts, particularly in the sections that cover anti-black violence (which was...way more horrific and comprehensive than I had realized), and anti-Indian violence. If I hadn't set my goal of reading the entire Oxford History I would relegate this 900 page phone book to the garbage bin. In comparison, white southerners also resisted US policy by defying the 14th amendment and repressing and terrorizing Black Americans. For the rest of the century Southerners contended that the banking system, the tariff, and federal subsidies for internal improvements discriminated against the South, and they clearly did.”, “What was developing in the South was a coercive labor system, which although not slavery, was not free labor either. The name of the party originated from republicanism, which was the principal value during the times of American Revolution. I am reading the Oxford History of the USA. White relies heavily if not exclusively on secondary sources, but that in no way diminishes his herculean accomplishment. I'll be looking for this author's other works. It encompasses the attempts at reconstruction, the development of big industry, and the rise of the populist movement. Yet this book in the Oxford History of the United States series packs an information-dense punch, and it is sure to leave readers with a deeper understanding of an often overlooked age. After all, these are folks who rose up in a treasonous war against the United States in the defense of slavery, yet people who call themselves patriotic Americans think we need monuments to these criminals. Too many examples abound. This massive volume of nearly 900 pages of text had me intimidated at first but in no time at all I found that it was as readable as a good popular history. They would make incarnate the new world Republicans imagined at the end of the Civil War. The first edition of, “A European visitor in the 1880s remarked that the only sense not offended by American cooking was hearing.”, https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-republic-for-which-it-stands-9780199735815?prevSortField=1&sortField=8&start=0&resultsPerPage=20&prevNumResPerPage=20&lang=en&cc=us#, Best Books About Nineteenth Century History, Born in the 1960s - What We've Read in 2018, Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution 1863-1877, A Mystery Maven's Favorite Whodunits, Thrillers, and Capers of 2020. September 1st 2017 Some became American farmers; more became American workers.16”, The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896. The Republican Party is the present-day rival political party to the Democratic Party in the United States. The most recent volume in the Oxford History of the United States covers a somewhat schizophrenic phase in American history, that of Reconstruction through the Gilded Age. Modern republics are founded on the idea that sovereignty rests with the people, though who is included and excluded from the category of the people has varied across history. So it's long, a bit difficult, and not all the key themes are clear (the differences between anti-monopolism and populism, for example). Instead of cracking down, the US army abandoned Black Americans to be systematically oppressed through terror rides, lynchings, and institutional segregation and discrimination. "The Recompense of Life" Summary: Book X. As I began reading Richard Whites The Republic for Which it Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896, I glanced over to a brief review of the book by another Goodreads reader. We’d love your help. Not one that I have ever known would I care to meet again, either in this world or the next; nor is one of them associated in my mind with the idea of humor, thought or refinement. Welcome back. In addition, it is written through current political correctness and is not an objective history. In addition, it is written through current political correctness and is not an objective history. White shows the fiscures in the national ruling Republican Party between the liberals (free-marketers, private property over all, laisse-faire gold standardists) and the Radical Republicans (equality and civil rights for all citizens, especially in the South). I'm a quick reader, and my Kindle said it took about 40 hours, give or take. Another great addition to the Oxford History of the United States! (for instance if you read his RAILROADED you are not going to learn all that much from the parts of this book about RAILROADs). (Really, an obsession with homes was a defining characteristic of the Gilded age? The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896. He sees Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as results of Abe Lincolns ideology of a republican government of, by, and for the people. It is the latest volume of the Oxford History of the United States. It has a lot of really interesting anecdotes and stories -- stuff about the White City at Chicago during the World's Columbian Exposition, Buffalo Bill's Wild West, the mark Abraham Lincoln's assassination left on the country, the. This book is a recent addition to the Oxford History of the United States. The author provides an overarching theme that carried through out the many chapters in the book and that was the theme of the home. (Really, an obsession with homes was a defining characteristic of the Gilded age? Many readers of history see the advancement of a nation as springing from one major conflict to another but the time periods in between war provide so much pivotal history and the time in American history of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age is full of such rich history. Many readers of history see the advancement of a nation as springing from one major conflict to another but the time periods in between war provide so much pivotal history and the time in American history of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age is full of such rich history. Finally, White uses the home as a theme and symbol of what was both great in American History and a goal for all peoples. LitCharts makes it easy to find quotes by section, character, and theme. Though there was disagreement over specific issues, most Republicans would have said the party stood for some basic principles: fiscal sanity, free trade, strong on Russia, and that character and personal responsibility count. but some of the other people were really new and revelatory (white is. He thought the book good, but nowhere near James M. McPhersons Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, the volume immediately preceding this one in the Oxford History of the United States, but one that was written many years ago. The final book of The Republic begins with Socrates return to an earlier theme, that of imitative poetry. Their fortunes depended up on it.”, “Unemployment was a relatively new phenomenon, an artifact of the rise of industrial America where large gains in productivity often came at the expense of economic security. The role of the home and family permeated through out the many changing cultural, institutional, and religious spheres of the nation. Consider: This book is a recent addition to the Oxford History of the United States. This latest volume bounces around its topics, is idiosyncratic in its concerns and point of view, does not grip the reader, and manages to give too little information on some topics, and too much on others. Thus, our salute to the flag of the United States identifies us as a republic. No book has influenced my life more than Plato's Republic. The Republic for Which It Stands The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 (Book) : White, Richard : "During Reconstruction Northerners attempted to remake the United States in their own image. In lucid, witty, and often dramatic prose, Richard White makes sense of them all in a way that powerfully echoes the inequalities and environmental degradation of our own day. ― Richard White, The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age… Get the entire The Republic LitChart as a printable PDF. As late as 1880, the South had a quarter of the country’s population but only 10 percent of its currency.”, “Congress also refused to give the South subsidies proportional to those that went to the West and Northeast.”, “Southern rivers, ports, and harbors received a fraction of the funds devoted to the Eastern and Pacific states, and even the critical levees along the Mississippi River languished. White is very fond of certain intellectuals of the era, and if you aren't familiar with Jane Addams or William Dean Howells, you might find yourself lost at times. Thrasymachus, Polymarchus, and the others having gone on to enjoy the festival, Socrates, Glaucon, and Adeimantus are left alone to continue the debate on justice. The book assumes a lot, despite being so huge. The Republic for Which It Stands | The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multivolume history of the American nation. My notes follow. Speeches decrying that 99% are toiling away while 1% reap the rewards. There could have been more about America’s place in the larger global currents of this era. This is the newest book added to the History. One of the most powerful arguments in the book that shows the racism and government misconduct in the period is the author's comparison of how Native Americans and white southerners were treated by the US government and army. I'm a quick reader, and my Kindle said it took about 40 hours, give or take. A masterful work of extraordinary ambition. The Republic literature essays are academic essays for citation. This is a very long book. Sadly, some people will abuse this right, but it is fundamental to our freedom. This was the period that gave birth to modern. It's also seriously depressing in parts, particularly in the sections that cover anti-black violence (which was...way more horrific and comprehensive than I had realized), and anti-Indian violence. It was very interesting, and I kept coming back willingly. The book will mostly likely attract the serious student of history, in particular college students looking for a pithy quote or bibliographic references to individuals and events of the era. There is much to learn here, but what struck me most -- because of the times we live in, of course -- is how much the post-Civil War decades mirror our own. Notably, the Republican Party has won more than half of the last pres… Rather than just concentrating on the economic story, the political narrative, or the cultural developments, this book weaves together all aspects of that period. It assumes you knew which party the various presidents represented (it can be tough to keep track after Grant). In many cases they were massacred even when complying with US policy, as they were at the Massacre at Wounded Knee. It admittedly can be a difficult read: it is almost entirely a back and forth conversation between two people, Socrates and Glaucon, discussing the nature of man, the soul, justice, and what the most just society, or Republic, would look like. Presented in the form of a dialogue between Socrates and three different interlocutors, it is an inquiry into the notion of a perfect community and the ideal individual within it. This massive volume of nearly 900 pages of text had me intimidated at first but in no time at all I found that it was as readable as a good popular history. He shows the history of the west, with settlers. If you want to read a book about the Gilded Age, this is not a good choice. I wanted to prove to myself that the US had survived horrifically bad governance before, and we have. By 1900 it had declined to 40 percent, from a majority in 1860. Speeches decrying that 99% are toiling away while 1% reap the rewards. Colonel, U.S. Representative, “Dad,” and Scourge of the Far Left. Bought this one as part of the reading of the Oxford History of the United States. A good book, providing a history of America from the end of the Civil War to McKinley’s Presidency. I picked up this mammoth book because I mistakenly thought, "900+ pages? He reiterates that while he is still content with having banished poetry from their State, he wishes to explain his reasons more thoroughly. Series: Oxford History of the United States [Publication Order], Book 9, Oxford History of the United States, Book 7. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Post Civil War America was looking to move past the horrors of the war and to turn to the domestic arena to build their new lives and the concept of the home as a family's kingdom dominated the time period. One person in particular to whom I'd like to recommend the book is. Length: 34 hrs and 41 mins. During this hectic, confused time period, America tried desperately to bind the nation's sectional wounds after a devastating Civil War, while leaving racial and class divisions untouched, even worsened. Richard White's massive volume on Reconstruction and the Gilded Age of American history (1865-1896) seeks explicitely to tie the two together instead of seperating them as has traditionally been practiced by historians. Particularly the sections that dealt with the railroad and the corruption in the US government stood out as being very well-written and researched. The Republic for Which It Stands The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 (Book) : White, Richard, 1947- : "During Reconstruction Northerners attempted to remake the United States in their own image. The dialogue on theological principles picks up where it left off in the previous book. "Of Wealth, Justice, Moderation, and Their Opposites" Summary: Book I. Along with this you have the growth of immigration, the reestablishment of racist repression and terror in the Jim Crow period in the South, and the rise of the modern labor movement and massive labor conflicts. Richard White offers a comprehensive history of the political economy of the time that nevertheless feels incomplete. General readers may quickly become, This is certain to be the "definitive" history of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, at least until the next "definitive" history comes along. No longer was America represented by Lincoln’s iconic log cabin, but rather Carnegie’s steel mills. 2980 N. National Road, Suite A, Columbus, IN 47201. White relies heavily if not exclusively on secondary sources, but that in no way diminishes his herculean accomplishment. They struck out the word “white.”, “Republicans had reintroduced a bill that he had originally sponsored that moved beyond political equality toward a fuller social equality by prohibiting racial discrimination in public accommodations.”, “The absolute number of workers in agriculture continued to rise until the twentieth century, but agriculture’s share of the national workforce fell. Now I realize how dramatic the change was in those three decades. Really didn't know much about the period after the Civil War, so I was looking forward to reading this one. Eleanore Ferranti ... this is what a lot of Republicans believe and what the Republican Party stands for. Trump seems to be the reincarnation of Andrew Johnson. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Republic. The topics of interest to this book are numerous from the immediate end of the Civil War and the subsequent politics up through the crisis/compromise of 1876 (perhaps an even more contentious election than 2016), and. Rather than just concentrating on the economic story, the political narrative, or the cultural developments, this book weaves together all aspects of that period. It's a fairly comprehensive history of the US from Lincoln's assassination in 1864 to the turn of the 20th Century. The 2nd amendment is sacred to our free republic. it's VERY long and some of the people white uses to pry open both the narrative and the significance of history are people you have probably heard of already ready -- WCTU, two different henry adamses, tom scott. So the idea I had for myself, to give myself some reading structure is based on finding a review for this history and adding some fiction to supplement it. With Adeimantus and Glaucon as auditors, Socrates recommences his attack on libelous poetry and fiction as unsuitable for the early education of the guardians of the State. From its humble beginnings as a tiny kingdom in central Italy, Rome grew to envelope the entire Mediterranean until it ruled an empire that stretched from the Atlantic to … The big themes are explored - exploitation of the Native American population, monopolies, terrible presidents in sequence, and big political swings. all readers, especially those interested in how we got to today's status quo. I dont think this is up to series standards. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. "My students can't get enough of your charts and their results have gone through the roof." Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Republic and what it means. Reconstruction And The Gilded Age In The Oxford History Of The United States. Be the first to ask a question about The Republic for Which It Stands. "The Republic for Which It Stands illuminates every key aspect of the industrializing, expanding nation in the final third of the nineteenth century: racial, ecological, legal, political, economic, and cultural. It encompasses the attempts at reconstruction, the development of big industry, and the rise of the populist movement. In this comparison case and in many other ways, the author shows the hypocrisy and major failings of American Capitalism during the period of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. The Republic Stands. Then there is the conquest and initial settlement of the west, the growth of the railroads with the completion of the transcontinental roads, and the explosion of American industrial growth. The Native Americans were lied to, mistreated, and systematically destroyed for resisting US policy. The South was demonstrating that there were routes to capitalist development—both agricultural and industrial—that did not rely on free labor.”, “I have known tolerably well, a good many “successful” men—“ big” financially—men famous during the last half-century, and a less interesting crowd I do not care to encounter. I was familiar with Richard Whites research on the railroads. If I hadn't set my goal of reading the entire Oxford History. Nobody covers Columbus, Indiana and the surrounding areas like The Republic. There is no trajectory to show where this came from or how it was different than other periods. European peasants could not compete with cheap American grain and meat. To quote White, “Changing the national story from the Civil War to the West amounted to an effort to escape the shadow of the Gilded Age’s banished twin and evade the failure of Reconstruction.” Reconstruction failed because it was undermined by racial prejudices and overwhelmed by terror and violence. A Michigan Board of Health estimate in the 1880s claimed that one-third of all pregnancies ended in an abortion.”, “This was Whiggish free labor dependent on government subsidies, tariffs, and other interventions; it was far from liberal laissez-faire. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. "The Individual, the State, and Education" Summary: Book II. I also thought the author did an excellent. In the newest volume in the series, The Republic for Which It Stands, acclaimed historian Richard White offers a fresh and integrated interpretation of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age as the seedbed of modern America. The home was seen as the purest form of America where the citizenry would be built up, morality would be taught, and progress would be made. It is perhaps unsurprising, but no less impressive for that. To quote White, Changing the national story from the Civil War to the West amounted to an effort to escape the shadow of the Gilded Ages banished twin and evade the failure of Reconstruction. Those who dont learn history are doomed to repeat it. A set of mere money-getters and traders, they were essentially unattractive and uninteresting.”, “In 1800 the United States had a birth rate higher than any ever recorded for a European country, but it fell steeply and consistently throughout the century. It's a fairly comprehensive history of the US from Lincoln's assassination in 1864 to the turn of the 20th Century. Probability could compensate for the limits of human knowledge.”, “Keeping the money supply in balance and avoiding panics depended on the intervention of Treasury officials, which was one of the things liberals hated about it. If you want to read a book about the Gilded Age, this is not a good choice. It has a lot of really interesting anecdotes and stories -- stuff about the White City at Chicago during the World's Columbian Exposition, Buffalo Bill's Wild West, the mark Abraham Lincoln's assassination left on the country, the growth & development & corruption of railroads, how immigrants saw baseball as a corrupting influence for their children, the creation of Coca-Cola, and so on and so forth. I especially appreciated how the author told the story through individuals, but did so in a way that still got to the larger picture vice narrowing the focus to that historical figure’s specific accomplishments. But worthwhile if you're interested in a time that seems very parallel to our own. I should get a good sense of what life was like for different types of people during the Gilded Age and how the many changes affected their lives from a book like that!" This thought pervaded my reading of this book. It is the latest volume of the Oxford History of the United States. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Now I realize how dramatic the change was in those three decades. It was better to strike a deal with the Central Pacific; otherwise the chain of debt would choke even more banks. It is poorly written, terribly organized, and pedantic. America felt such big reverberations. I found out that Donald Trump is not our first supremely unqualified and incompetent president. I knew some of the themes of the period such as reconstruction, Jim Crow, robber barons, gilded age, etc., but wanted a better understanding of how it all fit together. 941 … Republic, form of government in which a state is ruled by representatives of the citizen body. The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 (Oxford History of the United States) An unjust person who has a reputation for justice leads a life of pleasure. In December 1867 the figure rose to 80.5 percent, with the entire increase coming in the old Confederacy.”, “In the Northeast there was $77 in circulation per inhabitant. A good book, providing a history of America from the end of the Civil War to McKinleys Presidency. We are reliving aspects of this history: division into rich and poor, tariffs on steel, debates over home, immigration, division over race, and corporate "personhood." Obviously I enjoyed this book since I made it all the way to the end of nearly 900 pages. I found out that Donald Trump is not our first supremely unqualified and incompetent president. Though the dialogue is retold by the narrator, Socrates, one day after it has occurred, the actual events unfold in house of Cephalus at the Piraeus on the festival day of the goddess Bendis (Artemis). It created a society that Southern Radical governments sought to emulate, but they lacked the resources and advantages that the federal government bestowed outside the South.”. General readers may quickly become overwhelmed by the sheer volume of White's research. “A European visitor in the 1880s remarked that the only sense not offended by American cooking was hearing.”, “South Carolina, the Tweed Ring, the New York City riots, and Santo Domingo fanned the fire of liberal rebellion; the only source of liberal outrage not yet prominent in the newspapers was the ubiquitous corruption of the Grant administration itself, which was as yet largely known only to insiders.”, “When whiskey was supposed to be taxed at $2 a gallon and sold for $1.25 a gallon, it did not take advanced math to guess something was amiss.”, “The great ironist quite unironically boiled “American” down to liberal and reduced the Republicans to a lazy betrayal and a policy of drift that allowed too many of the policies put in place during the war to endure and the problems that arose in the wake of war to fester.”, “Howells’s account of the necessary reforms amounted to a manifesto for Gilded Age liberalism: abolition of the tariff, civil service reform, return to the gold standard, curbing of democracy through limitations on suffrage, replacement of elected officials with appointed officials, and prevention of any extension of suffrage to women.95”, “Liberal” in the nineteenth-century United States and Europe designated people who in many, but not all, respects would be called conservatives in the twenty-first century. In lucid, witty, and often dramatic prose, Richard White makes sense of them all in a way that powerfully echoes the inequalities and environmental degradation of our own day. Let us know what’s wrong with this preview of, Published White’s tome covers three decades, 1865 to 1896, in 850 pages. (for instance if you read his RAILROADED you are not going to learn all that much from the parts of this book about RAILROADs). This is the newest book added to the History. Thrasymachus' definition is the central challenge of the rest of the Republic, as Socrates tries to prove him wrong. In exchange for all this, Americans believed that corporations had a greater obligation than other enterprises to serve a public good.”, “When industrial work crippled and epidemic diseases killed, and where chance—freaks of fortune—produced what John Maynard Keynes, the economist, would later call “the radical uncertainties of capitalism,” luck as much as effort seemed to dictate outcomes.”, “As the mayor of Chicago told a labor rally on May Day in 1867, eight hours of work had become more exhausting than ten or twelve hours had been earlier.”, “...It was no accident that some of the first bureaucracies took shape in the West: the National Forest Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs (which gradually took modern form as the older Indian Service sank beneath its long heritage of fraud and corruption), and the U.S. Geological Service. This is certain to be the "definitive" history of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, at least until the next "definitive" history comes along. Jay Gould scavenged the Union Pacific, saving it from bankruptcy and setting up what would eventually become one of his biggest financial killings.43”, “Corporations could raise funds through the sale of stock and bonds, and many states offered charters that gave stockholders limited liability: they would not be held responsible for the corporation’s debts beyond their own investment. Another great addition to the Oxford History of the United States! Professor White is the author of five books. THE ROMAN EMPIRE STANDS as the greatest political achievement in the history of Western civilization. Recent events prompted me to puzzle over why so many Americans see Confederate leaders as an important part of our heritage and something deserving of honor. The book covers the period from Reconstruction (beginning with the death of Lincoln) up until the election of McKinley as President in 1896. We assign a color and icon like this one to each theme, making it easy to track which themes apply to each quote below. I have read several of the others and found this one a bit dry, but it was worthwhile. Kellye Garrett's first novel, Hollywood Homicide, was released in August 2017 and won the Agatha, Anthony, Lefty, and Independent Publisher... To see what your friends thought of this book, Whites tome covers three decades, 1865 to 1896, in 850 pages. Incredible, fantastic history of Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. It depended on extralegal violence, coercive laws, burdensome debt relations, and the use of convict labor to limit alternatives. Plato means for Thrasymachus to seem foolish and unpleasant, and his demand for pay, customary for Sophists, is a deliberate blot on his character. A summary of Part X (Section2) in Plato's The Republic. Quotes By Richard White. Reconstruction failed because it was. Richard White holds the Margaret Byrne Professorship in American History at Stanford University, California and is widely regarded as one of the nation's leading scholars in three related fields: the American West, Native American history and environmental history. The text and prose is often tedious making somewhat vacuous points. It created a society that Southern Radical governments sought to emulate, but they lacked the resources and advantages that the federal government bestowed outside the South.”, “Collectivizing risk and considering the community as a whole rather than the individual was a form of “communism,” but the practice paradoxically allowed people to maintain their belief in individualism.

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